Sunday, 31 March 2019

Albacete Campaign – Day 1


Campaign Map on 8 September 1813
Suchet opens the campaign with an attack on Ropar.

16th Italian corps have 4 infantry, 1 cavalry and 1 artillery brigades
3rd Spanish corps have 3 infantry and 1 artillery brigades
There are also 3 militia brigades in the area, but not part of 3rd corps

The Italians win the battle.

Move 9 of Battle of Riopar
The Italians ignore the two guerrilla bands
They use their cavalry to pin the Spanish artillery
And all four infantry brigades to attack the village and supports

Spanish artillery fire on the Italian gunners at long range
A very lucky dice throw inflicts 10% casualties

The Italian infantry inflict 10% casualties on two Spanish brigades

The Spanish retreat before the Italians can engage them in hand to hand combat



Campaign Notes
The Italians have won the first battle of the campaign
But they have failed to do much damage to the Spanish corps
They have also allowed them to retreat

The two Spanish infantry brigades will be slightly weaker in future
But the Spanish have infantry to spare
It will not take long for 3rd Spanish corps to recover and take the field again

The Italians have only suffered 10% artillery casualties
But this will also remain for the duration of the campaign
It will reduce their combat and morale ability in this vital arm

The Italians had a full corps against one of the weaker Spanish corps
Despite this they failed to inflict serious damage and allowed them to withdraw

2 comments:

James Fisher said...

The impacts of attrition on the French-allied troops and 'elastic' nature of the Spanish are already evident!
This is gonna be a big task for the invaders (as it should be)!

thistlebarrow said...

Hi James

Thanks for your comment

It adds a lot of fun to the campaign to have the "blind card" of the guerrilla.

Each time they attack they have to be very lucky with the dice throw, but if successful they inflict really serious damage. However the more the French advance the more guerrilla brigades/bands that are available to attack isolated garrisons and supply trains.

The French field army have to consider this in addition to campaign casualties and increasing higher number of Spanish regular troops.

I quite miss this element when the campaign moves to northern Europe.

regards

Paul