Sunday, 29 April 2018

Fighting in a Built Up Area (BUA)


Table at start of Game


New BUA Rules
We use our own “house rules” to wargame the battles produced by our 1813 campaign.   We have developed these rules through extensive game play over the past 10 years.

They include fighting in a built up area (BUA), such as towns, villages and farms.   At present they are spread throughout the rules and we now want to combine them all in a single section called BUA.

At the same time we will simplify them and update to bring them in line with amendments in other sections of the rules.

As part of this process we are about to play the first test game, and I thought it might be of interest to some readers to read about it.   So over the next couple of weeks I will post each move of the game and explain the mechanics.


Current Wargame Rules
First I need to explain a few principles of the rules themselves.

There are a maximum of 12 moves in a game, each representing one hour in the campaign.

Each move we dice (or draw a chip for large games) to decide which side moves first.   This can make a huge difference, as they can then move and fire first.

Commanders have a command range of 8”.   To issue orders he must be within that range of the brigades concerned.   He is allowed one order for each Formed brigade (none for those disordered, shaken or in rout), plus one if he is a Poor commander and two if an Average commander.

Test Game
There are two corps in this game, one French and one British.   Their order of battle is below.   C types get minus one for combat and morale.


1st British Corps – General Stewart (Average)
1 infantry brigade     4000 men      B class          B firepower   B skirmish
2 infantry brigade     4000 men      B class          B firepower   B skirmish
3 infantry brigade     4000 men      C class         B firepower   C skirmish
4 infantry brigade     4000 men      C class         C firepower   C skirmish
1 cavalry brigade     1000 men      B class          light cavalry
1 corps artillery        1000 men      B class          30 9 pounder guns

8th French Corps – General Taupin (Poor)
29 infantry brigade   4000 men      B class          B firepower   B skirmish
30 infantry brigade   4000 men      B class          B firepower   B skirmish
31 infantry brigade   4000 men      C class         C firepower   C skirmish
32 infantry brigade   4000 men      C class         C firepower   C skirmish
8 cavalry brigade     1000 men      B class          lancers
8 corps artillery        1000 men      B class          30 9 pounder guns

The ground area of each BUA is determined by a 6x6” felt square.   One is a village or farm.   Two is a town.   Four is a city.      Only one brigade is allowed in each section.  However two brigades can attack each corner.

The French commander has orders to hold the area between the two hills, including the walled farm in the centre.   He has placed one B class brigade in the farm, and the second behind in support.  The two C class brigades are either side of the farm.   The cavalry are placed on his left to threaten any approach on that side.   Most important his artillery have been placed on his right to dominate the most open side and most easiest for the enemy to attack.   The long white card is the range and width of artillery fire.

The British commander has orders to take the farm.   His plan is to attack the farm with his artillery and two best infantry brigades.   He will hold the flanks but not advance unless the French do so.   His artillery is centre left and one of his B class infantry centre right, the second one in reserve behind the artillery.   His two C class brigades are on the flanks.   His cavalry is in reserve to keep the French guessing.

Link to Wargame Rules

2 comments:

Robert (Bob) Cordery said...

Paul,

This is looking very interesting and informative, and I am looking forward to seeing how the battle unfolds.

All the best,

Bob

thistlebarrow said...

Hi Bob

Thanks for your comment

It started off as an easy job, and then just grew and grew. The more I looked at it the more I realised that it would be better to rewrite the rules.

Good thing really, it is long overdue. And it will keep me busy for a couple of weeks.

regards

Paul